JPG 900 x 120 NEW COLOR WEB HEADER 2011

The American Kestrel (Falco sparverius), sometimes known as the Sparrow Hawk, is a small Falcon, and the only Kestrel found in the Americas. It is the most common falcon in North America, and is found in a wide variety of habitats. At 19–21 cm (7 to 8 inches) long, it is also the smallest falcon in North America.
American Kestrels feed largely on small animals such as grasshoppers, dragonflies, lizards, mice, grubs, and voles. Depending what is available in the area. They will occasionally eat small birds.
The kestrel has also been reported to have killed snakes, bats, and squirrels.
Three to seven eggs (typically four or five) are laid approximately 24–72 hours apart. The Kestrels will not be on the eggs constantly. Mostly Female and she will partially incubate to try to make the eggs hatch as close together as possible. Full incubation starts after all eggs are laid. In about 30 days the eggs begin to hatch. The chicks typically fledge (leave the nest box) at about 30 days, although we have witnessed sooner.

Nu-Sun Cinema is helping research the American Kestrel by logging all of our Kestrel’s movements in and around our 2 nest boxes.

The BELOW PHOTOS will help you determine which sex is currently on the eggs.

           Above: FEMALE in nesting box at night.        Left: FEMALE on nesting box.

        Above: MALE in nesting box at night.          Right: MALE on nesting box.

BELOW:  A few shots of young AMERICAN KESTREL FALCONS .

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